Posts From February, 2017

Light years away by Edurne Rubio – a review

I have been fortunate to attend a representation of “Light years away” by Ms. Edurne Rubio in Groningen, Netherlands. The artist is the daughter of one of the explorers of the cave system of Ojo Guareña, near Burgos, Spain and has a long and intimate connection with the caves. The performance mixes monologue, surround sound, video and theatrical performance. In its basic structure, it is the representation of a guided tour of the caves, one that is imaginary and not constricted by time or space. For those not knowing the caves, it is an extraordinary long (about 110 km known) cave system, with several subterranean lakes, at least 6 levels, and multiple openings. The upper cave system was frequented by humans from the Upper Paleolithic to the Late Bronze Age/Early Iron Age, in different moments, before being rediscovered only in the past century. There are significant traces of human presence, including complex panels of rock art, residues of torches, burials, and even ancient... Read the rest of this entry »
 

CFP EAA 2017: Applications using Hand-Held Portable X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometers

Session: #23 Theme & Session Format Theme: The ‘Third Science Revolution’ in Archaeology Session format: Session, made up of a combination of papers, max. 15 minutes each Title & Content Title: Applications using Hand-Held Portable X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometers Content: The production and use of hand-held X-ray fluorescence spectrometers has exploded over the last decade in its use on archaeological materials around the world due to its non-destructive nature, portability, and relatively modest cost for such analyses. While initially there were issues concerning its accuracy, due to the need for standards of the same material as the artifacts being tested, there are now numerous publications and research in progress on the use of pXRF on obsidian, ceramics, metals, and other artifacts, as well as soils, paintings and human remains to address a variety of important archaeological research topics. The portability of the instrument has allowed analyses to be conducted within... Read the rest of this entry »
 

EAA Annual Meeting - Session: Present identities from the past

Prof. Dragos Gheorghiu and I are organising a session at the forthcoming EAA meeting in Maastricht. The session is entitled: “Present identities from the past: providing a meaning to modern communities” and will accept submissions until the 15th of March. We invite interested scholars and postgraduate students to submit papers or participate in the discussion. I am happy to answer any query you may have. Session: #233 Theme & Session Format Theme: Twenty-five Years after Maastricht: Archaeology and Europe's future Session format: Session, made up of a combination of papers, max. 15 minutes each Title & Content Title: Present identities from the past: providing a meaning to modern communities Content: The fundamental relevancy of archaeology has been increasingly questioned in recent years, because the discipline has traditionally been an intellectual investigation into the mysteries of the past, often without a purpose, even one just perceived or imagined. The present time... Read the rest of this entry »
 

Bruniquel Cave

In 2016, a series of structures composed of whole and broken stalagmites has been found in a French cave, Bruniquel Cave. The structures, referred to as “speleofacts”, have been dated to 176.5 thousand years (±2.1 thousand years), using Uranium-thorium dating of the regrown stalagmites. At that age, only the Neanderthals inhabited Europe, and therefore they must have been responsible for them. They are located at 336 m from the entrance, in a naturally dark spot of the cave that required some confidence in inhabiting caves and using lamps to move around. The six structures are composed of one to four layers of aligned stalagmites, proving that they are the result of deliberate planning and construction work. Traces of fire are found mostly on the structures, and not on the floor. Two structures are annular, one large and one small, there are then four smaller structures near or reinforcing the large structure. The largest annular structure is 6.7 × 4.5 m, and the smaller one is 2.2 ×... Read the rest of this entry »